Anybody Out There?

Lily/16/Michigan

welcome to heck, heckers

notforthetoweringdead:

"If more girls wanted to be scientists, there would be more female scientists"

*takes a deep breath* WE LIVE IN A SOCIETY THAT ACTIVELY DISCOURAGES FEMALE INTELLIGENCE BY PAINTING IT AS A NON FEMININE TRAIT AND SETS UP MALES TO BE IN POSITIONS OF ACADEMIC SUPERIORITY DESPITE THERE BEING NO CORRELATION BETWEEN GENDER AND ACADEMIC ABILITY thank you for your time

stability:

churrodestroyer:

stability:

when your next victim finally comes into the stall

image

This is fucked up. I’m crying.

aw no, dont cry. come sit down lets talk about it

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lizardvvizard:

representation-isms:

Do you ever get rly pissed because the hunger games films could’ve told such a deep story with themes that reflect our own society’s oppressive systems

but instead they whitewashed the main leads, erased their disabilities, and pretty much romanticized the violence

The degree to which THG movies play into exactly the things the story condemns will never not be staggering to me

(Source: lockedoutofhollywood)

sexgodsnarry:

IF YOU ARE THE TYPE OF GUY THAT KISSES A GIRL ON THE TOP OF THE HEAD WHEN YOU HUG THEM THEN YOU ARE DOING IT RIGHT MY FRIEND

someone-somewheree:

gen-tan:

xeduo:

welcome-foolishmortals:

This is going on my tumblr again.

every october

and some of the months in-between

I get it…

when the one ghost turns his head AWW HAHABAHABH<3

dad-rock-davos:

transhumanisticpanspermia:

rachellebutler:

Treble clefs by (L to R) Bach, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Mendelssohn, Schumann, Brahms, Debussy, and Ravel.
Source

all musicians across all time periods: “fck how does that thing go”

Beethoven didn’t even try

dad-rock-davos:

transhumanisticpanspermia:

rachellebutler:

Treble clefs by (L to R) Bach, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Mendelssohn, Schumann, Brahms, Debussy, and Ravel.

Source

all musicians across all time periods: “fck how does that thing go”

Beethoven didn’t even try

alltheselittlevoices:

haleepls:

hold-a-lover-close:

owlturdcomix:

We go forward.

This is too deep to comprehend.

Stop it

I THOUGHT THIS WAS GOING TO BE FUNNY

wire-man:

askamericatheheroyeah:

seriffluoride:

carrying—my—crosses:

doodlee-a:

GUYS, THIS IS IMPORTANT. I’ve been a lifeguard for four years, and I didn’t fully appreciate this until a little kid jumped into the shallow end of the lap pool. He wasn’t flailing. His eyes were wide in panic and h would try and push himself off the bottom, but the water was right over his head. It took me a couple seconds to register what had happened, and fortunately, another swimmer right beside the kid managed to grab him when he saw my reaction.

My mother and I run a water safety non-profit organization and this is one of the things we teach.In movies someone who is drowning always yells and screams and it’s very dramatic and obvious but in real life you really have to be paying attention


I was on holiday in Egypt when I was 14, and there was a 4-year-old Italian boy I had to save because no-one else even thought he was in trouble. Luckily, the water wasn’t too deep and only came up to my waist, but the kid was so small it covered his head. All he did was gasp for air and angle his head up, and tried kicking off the pool floor while reaching his hands up. I sat him on the edge of the pool in the shallow end and then his mother came over and thanked me.
I didn’t think much of it then, but I saved a life that day.
THIS COULD LITERALLY SAVE A LIFE.

After 2 years of lifeguarding and many more of competitive swimming I can verify this. Drowning signs are eerily quiet. It helps to catch them early. The pool I worked at had a large amount of regular clients. I’d always keep an extra lookout for people I didn’t recognize since I didn’t know their swimming ability. Their face aiming towards the sky is the first thing they’ll almost always do. Especially children.

wire-man:

askamericatheheroyeah:

seriffluoride:

carrying—my—crosses:

doodlee-a:

GUYS, THIS IS IMPORTANT. I’ve been a lifeguard for four years, and I didn’t fully appreciate this until a little kid jumped into the shallow end of the lap pool. He wasn’t flailing. His eyes were wide in panic and h would try and push himself off the bottom, but the water was right over his head. It took me a couple seconds to register what had happened, and fortunately, another swimmer right beside the kid managed to grab him when he saw my reaction.

My mother and I run a water safety non-profit organization and this is one of the things we teach.

In movies someone who is drowning always yells and screams and it’s very dramatic and obvious but in real life you really have to be paying attention

I was on holiday in Egypt when I was 14, and there was a 4-year-old Italian boy I had to save because no-one else even thought he was in trouble. Luckily, the water wasn’t too deep and only came up to my waist, but the kid was so small it covered his head. All he did was gasp for air and angle his head up, and tried kicking off the pool floor while reaching his hands up. I sat him on the edge of the pool in the shallow end and then his mother came over and thanked me.

I didn’t think much of it then, but I saved a life that day.

THIS COULD LITERALLY SAVE A LIFE.

After 2 years of lifeguarding and many more of competitive swimming I can verify this. Drowning signs are eerily quiet. It helps to catch them early. The pool I worked at had a large amount of regular clients. I’d always keep an extra lookout for people I didn’t recognize since I didn’t know their swimming ability. Their face aiming towards the sky is the first thing they’ll almost always do. Especially children.

(Source: fuckyeahforensics)

inksplattersandearlyhours:

"Fred Potter, I actually let your mother name you after the bravest man she knew, instead of making it all about me. Now promise me that you’ll take a picture of McGonagall’s face when she realises the prankster legacy you and James plan to live up to. Awesome. High five.”

snarkysourwolf:

ask-demon-connie-springles:

ashighasginger:

mattharv666:

skankmcmeow:

I see your shifting gaze, that disgusted glance. I know you’re questioning my parenting from across the elementary school assembly.

Let me tell you a little story about the kindergarten student with bright purple hair, my little Raven Marie…

A month before school started she decided to play hair stylist with the craft scissors, and to save what was left I had to opt for a pixie cut. She was absolutely devastated. It was about three hours before she stopped her harsh sobbing and hiccups.

Why?

She has thought that the length of a girls hair was what made her “girly”. I know I’ve personally had many hairstyles around her before, including a purple mohawk, which many people criticized as not being “girly” enough. Media, other children, other parents, and society made it worse. She would randomly burst in tears while out in public for the first week of her new style, screaming that she looked like a boy. That everyone would think she’s a boy.

At one point she took off her bow in her hair, threw it at a cashier and screamed, “I DON’T NEED THIS BOW TO TELL YOU THAT I’M NOT A BOY, BECAUSE I’M NOT”

Proudly stomping away in her blue jean overalls, head held high.

Once we edged closer to the first day of school she kept asking questions like, “Do you think the other kids will like me? Do you think they’ll be my friend? Will they think I’m a boy? Will they pick on me because I have boy hair?”

So I went to the grocery store, bought some dye, and spent the whole night transforming my bright blonde little girl into a plum punk rock fairy. I then assured her that if any of the kids didn’t like her, they were just jealous.

As for you, mothers and teachers with the wandering eyes filled with disgust and judgement, I’m in the business of raising a free spirit.

Here’s to you, Raven Marie. I love you.

Look at how fucking adorable that kid is holy fucking shit

Best mother award

Look how cute she is!!!

this is one of the most perfect posts I have seen in a long time